Family of Alexander McIvor Campbell and Isabella McDonald

Families

Married Husband Alexander McIvor Campbell
Married Wife Isabella McDonald
   
Event Date Place Description Notes Sources
Marriage 1855-09-14 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
1a
Initial desertion of Alexander Campbell to dig for gold at the Lachlan in NSW. 1860 Newham, Victoria, Australia  
2a
Per newspaper story and family oral history. 1863 Newham, Victoria, Australia  
 
Court proceedings re abandonment 1872-06-03 Woodend, Victoria, Australia  
2b
  Children
  1. Margaret Campbell
  2. Kenneth Campbell
  3. Roderick Campbell
  4. Alexander Duncan Campbell

Source References

  1. Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950
      • General:

        http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=ausmarrindex&h=4246288&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Source text:

        Marriage date: 1855 Marriage place: Victoria

  2. Hobart Mercury
      • Date: 14 June 1872
      • Page: 1872 'VICTORIA.', The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), 14 June, p. 3
      • General:

        http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8920885

      • General:

        Reprint of a story from Kyneton Guardian, 5 Jun 1872.

      • Source text:

        The matrimonial troubles of the Campbells occupied the attention of the Woodend bench for a long time on Monday morning. Mrs. Isabella Campbell charged her husband, Alexander Campbell, with deserting her, and leaving her and her four children without means of support, and the tale that she told was a pitiful one. Twelve years ago her husband went away to seek his fortune on the Lachlan diggings, leaving his wife and three children settled upon a small piece of land at Newham, the property of Mrs. Campbell's brother. Two years elapsed, and as the husband neither returned nor contributed to the support of his family, a warrant was obtained for his apprehension, but when the truant was brought back the heart of his wife relented ; the husband promised to be faithful in future, and the two lived comfortably together for some months. Campbell, however, soon grew tired of home, and once more bent his stops to the Lachlan, promising faithfully to send for his wife as soon as he had made his pile. At first he used to write regularly-"such loving letters," Mrs. Campbell told the bench-and remitted several sums of money ; but the letters and remittances gradually got less frequent, and at last ceased altogether ; whilst, to make matters worse, the brief visit home of the husband had added another to the family, and the wife had now four children dependent upon her exertions for support. For seven years she had managed to keep them and herself from actual starvation partly by tilling the little plot of ground upon which she was living, partly by going out to work, and partly by the kindness of the neighbours, many of whom were in court willing to bear testimony to the excellent character of the deserted wife. To add to her misfortunes, her house and furniture were destroyed by fire about twelve months ago, and she would have been absolutely homeless, but for the kindness and sympathy of some of the residents of Newham. It appeared that her husband was the owner-with his brother-of a farm of 235 acres, which had always been let, though no portion of the rent was ever received by the wife. The bench ordered security to be found for the payment of 10s. a week ; but Campbell said he would live with his wife and support her. Against this arrangement, however, Mrs Campbell vehemently protested, and offered to take 6s. a week if the bench would make the order so that she could get the money without the husband. When it was explained that no such order could be made, the friends of the parties concluded an arrangement by which Mrs. Campbell undertook, upon the receipt of £20 in cash, not to seek maintenance from her husband for the next six years, and to withdraw the summons. One- sided as such an arrangement was, it was gladly acquiesced in by the wife ; and at its conclusion, the husband jeeringly told her that she had made a fool of herself, for that he was about to sell his farm, and that she would not be able to got a penny of the money.-Kyneton Guardian, 5th June.

      • Date: 14 June 1872
      • Page: 1872 'VICTORIA.', The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), 14 June, p. 3
      • General:

        http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8920885

      • General:

        Reprint of a story from Kyneton Guardian, 5 Jun 1872.

      • Source text:

        The matrimonial troubles of the Campbells occupied the attention of the Woodend bench for a long time on Monday morning. Mrs. Isabella Campbell charged her husband, Alexander Campbell, with deserting her, and leaving her and her four children without means of support, and the tale that she told was a pitiful one. Twelve years ago her husband went away to seek his fortune on the Lachlan diggings, leaving his wife and three children settled upon a small piece of land at Newham, the property of Mrs. Campbell's brother. Two years elapsed, and as the husband neither returned nor contributed to the support of his family, a warrant was obtained for his apprehension, but when the truant was brought back the heart of his wife relented ; the husband promised to be faithful in future, and the two lived comfortably together for some months. Campbell, however, soon grew tired of home, and once more bent his stops to the Lachlan, promising faithfully to send for his wife as soon as he had made his pile. At first he used to write regularly-"such loving letters," Mrs. Campbell told the bench-and remitted several sums of money ; but the letters and remittances gradually got less frequent, and at last ceased altogether ; whilst, to make matters worse, the brief visit home of the husband had added another to the family, and the wife had now four children dependent upon her exertions for support. For seven years she had managed to keep them and herself from actual starvation partly by tilling the little plot of ground upon which she was living, partly by going out to work, and partly by the kindness of the neighbours, many of whom were in court willing to bear testimony to the excellent character of the deserted wife. To add to her misfortunes, her house and furniture were destroyed by fire about twelve months ago, and she would have been absolutely homeless, but for the kindness and sympathy of some of the residents of Newham. It appeared that her husband was the owner-with his brother-of a farm of 235 acres, which had always been let, though no portion of the rent was ever received by the wife. The bench ordered security to be found for the payment of 10s. a week ; but Campbell said he would live with his wife and support her. Against this arrangement, however, Mrs Campbell vehemently protested, and offered to take 6s. a week if the bench would make the order so that she could get the money without the husband. When it was explained that no such order could be made, the friends of the parties concluded an arrangement by which Mrs. Campbell undertook, upon the receipt of £20 in cash, not to seek maintenance from her husband for the next six years, and to withdraw the summons. One- sided as such an arrangement was, it was gladly acquiesced in by the wife ; and at its conclusion, the husband jeeringly told her that she had made a fool of herself, for that he was about to sell his farm, and that she would not be able to got a penny of the money.-Kyneton Guardian, 5th June.